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Does Colloidal Silver Work on Dogs?

Does Colloidal Silver Work on Dogs?

This article is for all of the dog-owners out there who are wondering if colloidal silver actually works on dogs. As you know, it is a popular home remedy that is used to cure many ailments in your furry friend, but do you really know what it is? Is it safe? And more importantly, does it even work? We will answer these questions and more so that you can make an informed decision on whether or not this treatment should be given to your pup.

What’s Colloidal Silver?

Colloidal silver is a suspension of microscopic particles of pure elemental silver in water. It’s not quite as strong and effective as antibiotic medicine, but it has many applications for dog owners who want to avoid using drugs or antibiotics on their pets. And unlike other medicinal products that are created with ingredients like sugar and cocoa powder, this one can be given to your dog without worry about side-effects from food allergies or sensitivities.

This has led to its popularity today among people who seek natural remedies for themselves...and now they're seeking them out for their dogs too! But are these claims true? Does colloidal silver really work on dogs? Where should you get the best quality colloidal

Products sold online that have "colloid" in their names may also try to sell you on other health benefits ... such as curing cancer, AIDS and more. There is no scientific evidence for these claims. And even if there was, any research would need approval from the US Food and Drug Administration before being marketed with those claims here in America.

Most colloidal silver is made by running electrical current through a water solution. The products that are the safest for your dog are those that use this method because it eliminates any possibility of contamination with other minerals and metals.

Should I use Colloidal Silver on my dog?

There's no evidence to show Colloidal Silver actually works as advertised - so you may be wasting your money! In addition, some experts warn that overuse or misuse could result in unwanted side effects on dogs such as skin sensitization reactions (most common), organ system toxicity, neurological damage and liver failure. Again: not worth the risk just yet! More research needs to be done before we know if they're safe enough for your pet.

It is possible for colloidal silver to work as it's supposed to. But it's harder than you might think! Colloidal silver products can also be dangerous if they're not manufactured correctly or are diluted with something else. It is a good idea to research the company that produces them and make sure they have been in business long enough, so you know their product isn't going bad soon - which could lead to side effects on your dog like those mentioned above.

The colloidal silver is not made to be ingested. It's not safe for your dog the same way it is for humans. But many people think that because they use toothpaste containing silver, or chew gum with it as an ingredient, that this means their dogs should have colloidal silver too! That couldn't be further from the truth. In fact, some veterinarians warn against giving pets anything like this at all - and will refuse to treat them if you insist on using colloidal silver instead of following the vet’s advice!

What about holistic vets? Well... these are mixed opinions as well. Some may tell you yes: give him a few drops in his water every day (or even better: put drops on his food bowl ) and he'll be cured! Others may say that there is no proof whatsoever, and recommend other treatment methods.

In the end, it's up to you whether or not this is something you want to try for your dog. But don't just go blindly into using colloidal silver if a vet has specifically told you not to use it - they're the expert in deciding what will work best with his situation. And always remember: even when a remedy seems like it should help, natural cures won’t work on every type of ailment, so keep an eye out for symptoms worsening instead of getting better (this means stop giving him more!). Finally...remember that supplements are meant as complimentary treatments only They won't replace medicine prescribed by a professional vet.

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